Pacific Highway road signs to boost tourist spend in bypassed towns

Image of a new sign, courtesy of the NSW Government.

Upgrades along the Pacific Highway are bypassing towns that used to be part of the main route.

To encourage tourist dollars to continue to be spent in these towns the NSW Government is investing in new signs that show the services and tourists attractions on offer.

Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole said the signs would be installed near Ballina, Urunga and Woolgoolga, under the NSW Government’s commitment to boost regional economies.

“The Pacific Highway upgrade is the largest regional road infrastructure project in Australia and is transforming journeys along the North Coast,” Mr.  Toole said.

Upgrades are expected to reduce travel times by two and a half hours between Hexham and the Queensland border.

“We still want tourist dollars being spent in regional towns where possible. That’s why we’re delivering on our election commitment to install these signs which will outline what services or tourist attractions are on offer,” he said.

“These signs are the largest directional signs in NSW, and will be installed on the highway at both the northbound and southbound approaches to the town.”

Member for Coffs Harbour Gurmesh Singh said Transport for NSW had worked with the local council to develop the preferred images for the signs, which were installed at Woolgoolga in early May.

“These signs have been popular in other locations, driving more visitors to regional towns and tempting them to explore what they have to offer,” Mr. Singh said.

“Woolgoolga is first in line to receive the signs, showcase the village and its close proximity to the beach.”

Each sign will have symbols to indicate what services are available, including hospitals, 24-hour fuel, food and accommodation, and are reflective so motorists can easily see them at night.

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